Plymouth travel guide

Cities and towns

About Plymouth

Plymouth, the largest city in the South West, has beautiful scenery, a wealth of attractions and a fascinating maritime history. In 1577 Francis Drake launched his circumnavigation of the globe from Plymouth and repelled the Armada a few years later, the Pilgrim Fathers set sail from here in 1620, and in 1831 Charles Darwin departed for his pioneering trip to the Galapagos Islands.

The city overlooks the English Channel and is flanked by the river Plym to the east and the river Tamar to the west. It is broken up into three main sections: the Barbican with its narrow streets and Tudor and Victorian buildings, the Hoe, with its famous promenade overlooking the Plymouth Sound, and the modern central section, flattened during the war and then rebuilt.

Nearby attractions

The Barbican is the name now given to the western and northern sides of the old harbour area of Plymouth. It was one of the few parts of the city to escape most of the destruction of The Blitz during the Second World War.

Plymouth Hoe is undoubtedly the heart of the city, and offers incredible views out across Plymouth Sound, Mount Batten and the Cornish coast.

Plymouth Boat Trips is Plymouth's premier fishing, ferry and cruising company. Located on the historic Barbican, they offer fun packed fishing trips and relaxing harbour cruising as well as regular ferry departures from the...

Smeaton's Tower is one of the South West's most well-known landmarks and is the centrepiece on Plymouth Hoe. Originally the lighthouse was built on the Eddystone reef in 1759 but it was taken down in the early 1880s because...